Quotes by John Henry Cardinal Newman

A great memory does not make a mind, any more than a dictionary is a piece of literature.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
A man would do nothing if he waited until he could do it so well that no one could find fault.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Ability is sexless.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Calculation never made a hero.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Evil has no substance of its own, but is only the defect, excess, perversion, or corruption of that which has substance.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Growth is the only evidence of life.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
In this world no one rules by love; if you are but amiable, you are no hero; to be powerful, you must be strong, and to have dominion you must have a genius for organizing.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
The love of our private friends is the only preparatory exercise for the love of all men.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
There is such a thing as legitimate warfare: war has its laws; there are things which may fairly be done, and things which may not be done.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
To holy people the very name of Jesus is a name to feed upon, a name to transport. His name can raise the dead and transfigure and beautify the living.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
To live is to change, and to be perfect is to have changed often.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
We can believe what we choose. We are answerable for what we choose to believe.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
From the age of fifteen, dogma has been the fundamental principle of my religion: I know no other religion; I cannot enter into the idea of any other sort of religion; religion, as a mere sentiment, is to me a dream and a mockery.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
It is almost the definition of a gentleman to say that he is one who never inflicts pain.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
It is as absurd to argue men, as to torture them, into believing.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Let us act on what we have, since we have not what we wish.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Virtue is its own reward, and brings with it the truest and highest pleasure; but if we cultivate it only for pleasure's sake, we are selfish, not religious, and will never gain the pleasure, because we can never have the virtue.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
If then the power of speech is as great as any that can be named,—if the origin of language is by many philosophers considered nothing short of divine—if by means of words the secrets of the heart are brought to light, pain of soul is relieved, hidden grief is carried off, sympathy conveyed, experience recorded, and wisdom perpetuated,—if by great authors the many are drawn up into unity, national character is fixed, a people speaks, the past and the future, the East and the West are brought into communication with each other,—if such men are, in a word, the spokesmen and the prophets of the human family—it will not answer to make light of Literature or to neglect its study: rather we may be sure that, in proportion as we master it in whatever language, and imbibe its spirit, we shall ourselves become in our own measure the ministers of like benefits to others—be they many or few, be they in the obscurer or the more distinguished walks of life—who are united to us by social ties, and are within the sphere of our personal influence.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
If then a practical end must be assigned to a University course, I say it is that of training good members of society. Its art is the art of social life, and its end is fitness for the world. It neither confines its views to particular professions on the one hand, nor creates heroes or inspires genius on the other. Works indeed of genius fall under no art; heroic minds come under no rule; a University is not a birthplace of poets or of immortal authors, of founders of schools, leaders of colonies, or conquerors of nations. It does not promise a generation of Aristotles or Newtons, of Napoleons or Washingtons, of Raphaels or Shakespeares, though such miracles of nature it has before now contained within its precincts. Nor is it content on the other hand with forming the critic or the experimentalist, the economist or the engineer, though such too it includes within its scope. But a University training is the great ordinary means to an great but ordinary end; it aims at raising the intellectual tone of society, at cultivating the public mind, at purifying the national taste, at supplying true principles to popular enthusiasm and fixed aims to popular aspiration, at giving enlargement and sobriety to the ideas of the age, at facilitating the exercise of political power, and refining the intercourse of private life. It is the education which gives a man a clear conscious view of his own opinions and judgments, a truth in developing them, an eloquence in expressing them, and a force in urging them.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman
Fear not that thy life shall come to an end, but rather fear that it shall never have a beginning.
– John Henry Cardinal Newman