Quotes by Liberty Hyde Bailey

Science may eventually explain the world of How. The ultimate world of Why may remain for contemplation, philosophy, religion.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
Take out of nationalism the blind prejudice, the over-organization, the self-interest for territory and for gold, and you remove its fangs. You then have left a political system for common betterment, a community of ideals, concrete enthusiasms, a means of effective training, racial and geographical cohesions, and programs to direct the lives of the people.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
Teachers of agricultural subjects who do not investigate are either dead or superficial, and in either case they are useless.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
The name of the subject is not fundamentally important. All subjects may be made the means of developing a man. What we call culture is not the result of a line of study, so much as the result of association with educated and sensitive persons. A well educated mind has a broad outlook. It develops beyond the specialist to the philosopher... We are learning that no subjects are unclean.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
The sense of conquest is in it. Not often is a collector able to obtain complete material in one assault. The plant may be at the moment sterile, or only in fruit or flower... but this lack has the advantage of stimulating the collector to go back in another season or year to complete the work.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
The true purpose of education is to teach a man to carry himself triumphant to the sunset.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
There are two essential epochs in any enterprise - to begin, and to get done.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
There is no excellence without labor. One cannot dream oneself into either usefulness or happiness.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
This College of Agriculture was not established to serve or to magnify Cornell University. It belongs to the people of the State. The farmers of the State have secured it. Their influence has placed it here. They will keep it close to the ground. If there is any man standing on the land, unattached, uncontrolled, who feels that he has a disadvantages and a problem, this College of Agriculture stands for that man.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
To people who grumbled at the weather he recommended a garden, as the best of remedies for that commonest of melancholies, for there is no weather that did not suit some plant. In the hottest and driest time the portulacas are burning red in the sand. In cool and cloudy weather the soft morning-glories remain open until noon. When the soil is soaked with rain the irises are in their glory.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
We accept it because we have seen the vision. We know that we cannot reap the harvest, but we hope that we may so well prepare the land and so diligently sow the seed that our successors may gather the ripened grain.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
We are now devoting ourselves to science. I am afraid some of us feel that science will give us final solutions - better bases for philosophy, an ideal groundwork for satisfactions, for enjoyment. But it is doubtful whether the mind of man can ever understand the universe. For every puzzle that we uncover and solve, two more appear that were hidden.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
We must tell it to the world that the higher education is necessary to the best agriculture. We must tell our friends of our enthusiasm for the generous life of the country. We must say that we believe in our ability to make good use of every lesson which the University has given us. We must say to every man that our first love is steadfast, our hopes are high, and our enthusiasm is great. Our hearts are so full that we must celebrate.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey
When the traveler goes alone he gets acquainted with himself.
– Liberty Hyde Bailey