Quotes by Jean de la Bruyere

A man of the world must seem to be what he wishes to be thought.
– Jean de la Bruyere
A pious man is one who would be an atheist if the king were.
– Jean de la Bruyere
A position of eminence makes a great person greater and a small person less.
– Jean de la Bruyere
A vain man finds it wise to speak good or ill of himself; a modest man does not talk of himself.
– Jean de la Bruyere
All men's misfortunes spring from their hatred of being alone.
– Jean de la Bruyere
At the beginning and at the end of love, the two lovers are embarrassed to find themselves alone.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Avoid lawsuits beyond all things; they pervert your conscience, impair your health, and dissipate your property.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Between good sense and good taste there lies the difference between a cause and its effect.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Children have neither a past nor a future. Thus they enjoy the present, which seldom happens to us.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Even the best intentioned of great men need a few scoundrels around them; there are some things you cannot ask an honest ma to do.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Grief that is dazed and speechless is out of fashion: the modern woman mourns her husband loudly and tells you the whole story of his death, which distresses her so much that she forgets not the slightest detail about it.
– Jean de la Bruyere
He who tip-toes cannot stand; he who strides cannot walk.
– Jean de la Bruyere
I would not like to see a person who is sober, moderate, chaste and just say that there is no God. They would speak disinterestedly at least, but such a person is not to be found.
– Jean de la Bruyere
If our life is unhappy it is painful to bear; if it is happy it is horrible to lose, So the one is pretty equal to the other.
– Jean de la Bruyere
If poverty is the mother of crime, lack of good sense is the father.
– Jean de la Bruyere
If some persons died, and others did not die, death would be a terrible affliction.
– Jean de la Bruyere
It is fortunate to be of high birth, but it is no less so to be of such character that people do not care to know whether you are or are not.
– Jean de la Bruyere
It's motive alone which gives character to the actions of men.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Liberality consists less in giving a great deal than in gifts well-timed.
– Jean de la Bruyere
Making a book is a craft, like making a clock; it needs more than native wit to be an author.
– Jean de la Bruyere